The People between the Rivers
Most of the research for this book was undertaken in the Division of Pacific and Asian History in the now-defunct Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies (RSPAS) at the Australian National University. I was very fortunate to be able to work closely with Li Tana, a skilled and imaginative historian with a deep knowledge of sources in Chinese,...
Catherine Churchman
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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The People between the Rivers
As one approaches the edges of the Chinese-speaking world, one must begin to make choices about how to transcribe Chinese names, as those beyond China’s borders who have historically used Chinese characters have their own traditions of transcription. Pinyin has become ubiquitous for the transcription of Chinese characters in any work dealing with China in any period, an unfortunate trend...
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Han 206 BCE–220 CE
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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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The People between the Rivers
~This book tells the story of a vanished culture that flourished in the mountain ranges in the south of the East Asian Mainland between the fourth and seventh centuries CE. This culture left behind a sizable collection of bronze kettledrums in the archaeological record, but nothing in the way of a written tradition until the descendants of the drum...
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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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~Every few years, in the lands to the west...
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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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~Near the entrances of the two great rivers to the sea lay the two metropolitan centers of Guangzhou and Jiaozhou. Known by various names over the centuries, these centers correspond to the present-day cities of Canton and Hanoi. The Sui shu compiled in the 630s described them in the following manner:
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~From the beginning of the first millennium CE onward, Chinese descriptions of the lands between the Two Rivers used various names to refer to the local inhabitants who were not under direct Chinese rule. Sometimes they would call them bandits or brigands, but usually they would use generalized terms for...
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~In the very earliest records of Li and Lao from the third and fourth centuries, the Li, Lao, and Wuhu political structures appear alien to the Chinese chroniclers and their customs are presented as impenetrable and barbaric. At this time it is easy to distinguish the “native”...
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~Interactions between the Southern Dynasties and the Li and Lao were by no means limited to peaceful alliance and cooperation. In the Southern Dynasties period in particular, the Chinese written record documents many instances of warfare, albeit mostly on a small scale and ultimately...
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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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~The desire of the Li and Lao between the rivers to possess their own drums is illustrated by a proclamation from the third year of the Taiyuan period of Emperor Xiaowu of the Jin (378 CE), which stated:
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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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The People between the Rivers
~As the preceding chapters have shown, the rise of the bronze drum culture between the rivers was a combination of geography, patterns of trade, and the special relationships between the Li-Lao chieftains and the Chinese empires that enriched the Li and Lao while ensuring they retained autonomous rule over their own territories. The...
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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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~I have argued that the maintenance of local rulers in the area was the result of the Han Empire having bypassed the lands between the Two Rivers and concentrating its attention instead on the control of the Red River Plain and the major tributaries of the Pearl River system, thus leaving a large unconquered territory outside the control of the...
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~Names are transliterated in Pinyin, with the exception of those in italics, which are in Sino-Vietnamese (Hán-Việt). Names in parentheses are alternative spellings, either in Pinyin or Sino-Vietnamese, that have not been used in the text but are provided for reference.
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BHL
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~administrative titles: change in meaning of, 113; Chinese application to Li and Lao, 17, 22, 31, 103–104, 108–109, 112, 171, 177, 179, 185–186, 192; in Red River plain, 29; significance of use of, 35, 92,...
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~~Catherine Churchman is a historian specializing in premodern East and Southeast Asia. She received her PhD from the Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies at the Australian National University and lectures on Asian studies at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand.
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The People between the Rivers
Crime, Punishment, and Policing in China
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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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