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Preface
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
80
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I grew up in the great Pacific Northwest, more specifically the Puget Sound area; Tacoma, to be precise. It rains frequently there, and even when it’s not raining, it’s often overcast. I didn’t find that nearly as depressing as some other residents do, especially those raised in sunnier climates. But I certainly looked forward to days when it was only partly cloudy, when...
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,269
Partly Cloudy
The first and second editions of this book have been nearly thirty years in the making, though not as a continuous project to the exclusion of other research. Much of my teaching and writing from 1989–2003 and since 2009 has focused instead on comparative professional ethics in medicine, law, business, and journalism. In the early 1980s at the University of Chicago Divinity School, I...
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,424
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Consider two scenarios: (1) a man points a gun at another man and shoots him dead, and (2) a woman lies to her family and friends about her occupation. Do those scenarios raise moral or ethical concerns? Obviously. Are the actions that they describe unethical or immoral? Most readers would probably say yes, at least at first glance (prima facie). But now consider the following permutations...
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
8,802
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This chapter highlights a wide range of ethical views on killing and war in several of the world’s major religious traditions. One can learn a lot about a religion or culture by paying close attention to how it answers the question, Is it ever right to kill?2. Although...
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
13,162
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Most of us assume that we have a basic right not to be killed. We might not consider this to be an absolute right—since it would entail strict pacifism—but rather what philosophers call a prima facie right (as explained in chapter 1). For example, we might be said to forfeit our right not to be killed if we commit a particularly heinous crime like aggravated...
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
5,238
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David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
7,080
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I have never experienced war directly. But in teaching and writing about the subject for nearly twenty years, I’ve tried to imagine...
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
10,851
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Few people today would dispute the claim that the consent of the governed is a necessary condition for legitimate government. Even illegitimate rulers pay lip service to the concept of popular consent in designating their regimes “people’s republics” and the like. Yet if consent is clearly fundamental to the Constitution of legitimate political authority, it is less obvious how...
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
7,536
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At the conclusion of John Ranelagh’s 1987 history of the CIA, he opined that the CIA was no longer viewed by Americans as the world’s savior or corruptor, but rather “as a reminder of how old and corrupt and incorrigible the rest of the world...
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
6,999
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David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
11,777
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There is a sense in which espionage or clandestine intelligence collection by itself represents a kind of intervention into another country’s political affairs, since it can result in foreign officials assuming that certain important secrets are safe when they are in fact not safe, and in their ignorance making plans they might not otherwise make, etc. It’s also true that an espionage...
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
11,079
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The term “assassination” typically connotes the murder of a political leader or otherwise prominent person, as in the killings of presidents Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy as well as Martin Luther King Jr.3. W. Hays Parks, “Memorandum on Executive...
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
7,166
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In our country’s contemporary efforts to combat terrorists, we face some difficult ethical questions: Do ruthless enemies merit or deserve ruthless countermeasures? Should we uphold high ethical standards even against unlawful combatants who don’t respect them? Or, in order to preserve what we value most, are we morally justified in using tactics (such as torture in...
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
15,745
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All of us are bound to recognize and uphold a number of objective and strong (albeit prima facie) ethical principles, including compassion for others and respect for their autonomy and dignity. Such principles do not entail strict pacifism nor forbid secret intelligence operations entirely. But they do require anyone in a position to authorize war, espionage, covert action or...
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,091
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aretaic (claims, considerations, principles focusing on character traits, virtues and vices), 4, 6–7, 63, 66, 70–72, 108–9, 140–48, 152,...
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,134
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Dr. David L. Perry is professor of applied ethics and director of the Vann Center for Ethics at Davidson College in North Carolina. There he has hosted over 100 public forums on a wide range of ethical issues, drawing a total of over 11,000 attendees, and taught courses on ethics and warfare, ethics in professional life, business ethics, the moral status of...
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
252
Partly Cloudy
In this post–September 11, 2001, era there has been rapid growth in the number of professional intelligence training and educational programs across the United States and abroad. Colleges and universities, as well as high schools, are developing programs and courses in homeland security, intelligence analysis, and law enforcement, in support of national security.
David L. Perry
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
202