Shattered Illusions
Given the immediacy and violence of the threats posed by various terrorist organizations over the last two or three decades, it is perhaps not a surprise that the threats posed by various Soviet Bloc intelligence services during the Cold War have receded into memory. While the writers of spy novels, and indeed most intelligence services, are focused largely on the activities of various terrorist...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
917
Shattered Illusions
~Yevgeni Vladimirovich Brik was a Soviet Illegal who was dispatched to Canada with instructions to establish himself in the Montreal area as a Canadian watch repairman. His KGB codename was HART. Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) corporal James Douglas Finley Morrison, a man who distinguished himself in Europe during World War II, had a brief...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,780
Shattered Illusions
The research and writing of this book has been a journey of four years in the making. The task was a little daunting considering that almost all of the principals have been deceased for many years. And of course, a great deal of the information remained classified and rested in the vaults of the CSIS and within the classified holdings of our national Library and Archives Canada.
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,349
Shattered Illusions
Yevgeni Vladimirovich Brik locked his single-bedroom ground-floor apartment at 5381 Bannantyne Avenue in Verdun, Quebec. He knew he would not be returning to his home for at least a couple of months. If things went badly, perhaps not at all. The three-floor red brick building contained nine apartments and was located at the busy intersection of Bannantyne and Argyle in this blue-collar...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2,383
Shattered Illusions
Yevgeni landed in Paris in the early morning of August 9, 1955. Rather than exhausting him, the long flight from Rio had reinvigorated him as he thought about the city and its fabled nightlife. He was still in possession of the false Joseph Bugyi Canadian passport that had served him well in Brazil. The documents were of such high caliber that he gained entry into France without difficulty.
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,441
Shattered Illusions
Yevgeni Vladimirovich Brik was born November 25, 1921, at his parents’ home at 65 Vorontsovskaya Street in the Black Sea port city of Novorossiysk in Krasnodar Krai. His birth certificate, #N601/211, was registered on December 2, 1921, by the Communist Party Executive Committee of Novorossiysk District.1
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,412
Shattered Illusions
Two years after the war Yevgeni was still employed at the ball bearing plant in Moscow and attending the Bauman Higher Technical Institute at night. One evening in March 1948, after classes were over, he returned to his apartment at 5 Kalisevsaya Street that he and his wife, Antonina, were sharing with Yevgeni’s parents. Antonina handed him a card that had been delivered to their...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,072
Shattered Illusions
As instructed by Sergeev, newly inducted KGB officer Yevgeni Brik, carrying a single suitcase, arrived at the prearranged, designated meeting point in central Moscow and waited to be picked up. He had been told that one of the KGB officers who had previously conducted his background security investigation would show up at 0800 hours. Precisely at the appointed time a vehicle pulled up in front of...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2,537
Shattered Illusions
Yevgeni thoroughly enjoyed the North Atlantic crossing from France to Canada. His sense of freedom and adventure had been ignited. He relaxed during the day and walked the ship in the evenings trying to imagine what life in Canada would be like. He knew from his studies that Montreal was an exciting, cosmopolitan city. And he looked forward to experiencing Toronto, Ottawa, and Vancouver in the...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,125
Shattered Illusions
Prior to leaving Moscow the KGB instructed Yevgeni to take a familiarization trip across Canada shortly after his arrival to bolster his knowledge of the country. In spite of his extensive studies at the library in Moscow about Canadian life, the KGB wanted Yevgeni to personally experience it. He had to put himself in a position where he could confidently discuss aspects about Canada...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
3,078
Shattered Illusions
In early June 1953, Yevgeni placed a letter in a Toronto dead drop asking for a meeting with Vasili Shitarev, KGB Resident at the Soviet Embassy in Ottawa.1 Yevgeni explained in his letter that he had had a disagreement with Leonid Abramov and that he was unhappy with the outcome. He wished to discuss the matter with Abramov’s superior. When approval for the meeting arrived...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2,072
Shattered Illusions
Yevgeni and Larissa’s adulterous affair was passionate, complicated, and based on a series of lies. Yevgeni led her to believe that he was an eligible bachelor. He had charisma, a wonderful sense of humor, and an aura of mystery about him. She was completely unaware of his background, knew nothing about his true identity, and of course, possessed no knowledge about his wife living in Moscow.
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2,527
Shattered Illusions
In the very early morning hours of November 26, prior to the scheduled meeting of RCMP sergeant Hanna and Corporal Linden with Yevgeni at the Maple Leaf Hotel, a very serious meeting was underway at RCMP HQ. The top officers of the Security Service gathered to discuss developments and plan strategy in relation to Operation KEYSTONE. The meeting was chaired by Superintendent James...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,848
Shattered Illusions
Yevgeni’s erratic behavior caused great consternation within RCMP HQ Security Service. Inspector Guernsey was deeply concerned that their double-agent operation against the KGB was in danger of imploding if Yevgeni did not end the affair with Larissa. Although she had recently left her husband, Larissa reconsidered that decision and returned to the family home. She had quickly recognized...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,185
Shattered Illusions
Vladimir Pavlovich Bourdine was a young, ambitious KGB officer. His posting to the Soviet Embassy, Ottawa, on May 21, 1949, predated Yevgeni’s surreptitious arrival in Canada by almost two years.1 Previously, Bourdine had gained valuable experience and confidence as an agent-running officer during an earlier posting to Washington, DC. He spent the war and postwar years...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,273
Shattered Illusions
The KGB Residency in Ottawa had been deeply criticized by The Centre in the years following the defection of GRU cipher clerk Igor Gouzenko in September 1945. His revelations of Soviet military intelligence spying caused a sensation that resulted in the conviction of Communist Party of Canada and Labour Progressive Party member of parliament Fred Rose, and others, on espionage charges. Canadian...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2,588
Shattered Illusions
James R. (Jim) Lemieux was a respected and experienced officer of the RCMP. In 1938 he received the RCMP Commissioner’s Commendation for successfully concluding a difficult Canada Excise Act investigation in St. Anselm, Quebec.1
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,454
Shattered Illusions
James Douglas Finley Morrison was born March 16, 1916, in Chatham, New Brunswick. The son of Angus Morrison and Ellen Gilmour, he was one of several children.1 Life for the large Morrison family was not particularly easy. Angus Morrison worked as a general laborer. He was not always an easy person to live with or be around.
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
3,911
Shattered Illusions
The Morrison family’s transfer to Ottawa was seen as a new beginning for Gwynneth. They were in a new, modern city that enjoyed culture, upscale shopping from what they had in small-town Saskatchewan, a theater, a great variety of restaurants, and what she saw as endless opportunities for her children in education and sporting activities. She was also happy to move away from small-town...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,263
Shattered Illusions
Treason, like infidelity, is committed in the mind before the actual deed is consummated. RCMP corporal James Morrison knew this firsthand. He was already known to be a Lothario, but now he was about to plunge headfirst into the treachery of treason.
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2,108
Shattered Illusions
Nikolai Ostrovskiy spent the entire afternoon conducting countersurveillance measures in an effort to determine whether he was being followed by the RCMP Watcher Service. To a casual observer, Ostrovskiy appeared to be spending the day aimlessly driving around Ottawa, randomly stopping at shopping areas and visiting cafés. In truth, he was executing a carefully predetermined route that was...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,640
Shattered Illusions
Nikolai Alekseyevich Korznikov, reputedly one of the most important and influential KGB officials in the First Chief Directorate’s Department S, the Illegals Directorate, motioned for Yevgeni to get into the black ZIS 110 limousine. The ZIS was developed by the Soviets by reverse engineering an American 1942 Packard Super Eight, which had been given to Josef Stalin as a gift by US...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,917
Shattered Illusions
On July 4, 1955, the RCMP Security Service discovered that Corporal James Morrison had misappropriated RCMP funds. He had stolen money that was owed to the local telephone company for service they provided to the force.1 Morrison used the stolen funds to pay off debts he owed. Constable Burton E. Flumerfelt, a work colleague, informed him that Inspector Terry Guernsey wanted to see him....
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,328
Shattered Illusions
Yevgeni Brik sat manacled to the interrogation table across from Nikolai Korznikov. A consummate professional, Korznikov was organized, always well prepared for the task at hand, and prone to thinking before he spoke. He was respected by his peers in Directorate S, and was known to be a man of conviction and principles. He was not the type of person who would pound the table and scream at his...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2,258
Shattered Illusions
One of the consequences of James Morrison’s transfer to Winnipeg, Manitoba, was that he returned to general police duties and the wearing of an RCMP uniform. More troubling to him, he was no longer in the Security Service and, therefore, did not have direct access to current classified information that he could exploit and sell to the Soviets. However, he was resourceful, and that was not...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,936
Shattered Illusions
In December 1953, during his incarceration and interrogation inside Lubyanka, Yevgeni was directed by Korznikov to write a letter to Mr. George Taruska, who lived at 5385 Bannantyne Avenue, Verdun, Quebec. This was the same apartment building where Yevgeni lived and where his photographic studio, Portraits by Soboloff, was co-located. Taruska, an honorable man who had no knowledge whatsoever of...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,492
Shattered Illusions
Several months after his prisoner escort trip to Ottawa at the end of October 1955, James Morrison returned to Ottawa again at the end of March 1956. On this occasion, his youngest son accompanied him. This trip, similar to several others that would follow over the next twenty-two months, was taken without written approval by Morrison’s superiors in the force. All members of the RCMP were...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,848
Shattered Illusions
The KGB in Moscow was intent on getting their hands on the British communications system that SIS officer Leslie Mitchell had told Yevgeni about during their Montreal meeting in the Queen Elizabeth Hotel. Mitchell had advised Yevgeni that once they established he was safe, the communications radio, along with the gun, maps, and other items he would require in an escape attempt, would be...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,344
Shattered Illusions
With Nikolai Ostrovskiy’s departure from Canada and Rem Krasilnikov’s arrival at the Soviet Embassy in Ottawa in early January 1957, Morrison’s chaotic life became more difficult. He was still drowning in debt and had been engaged in check kiting from at least June 1956, and perhaps earlier. His bank account contained only $10.57.1
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2,323
Shattered Illusions
Yevgeni had not seen Korznikov for several days. His only interaction with people was when the guards brought him his meals as he sat silently in the solitary confinement cell in Lubyanka. The loneliness and long hours played on his mind, and he imagined all manner of scenarios where he would be summarily executed. The interrogation sessions with Korznikov had slowed recently, and he sensed that...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
863
Shattered Illusions
James Morrison believed that he might be in jeopardy. The peculiar-looking man that he saw in the green-colored Ford or Chevrolet while he was having a clandestine meeting with KGB officer Rem Krasilnikov could have been a member of the RCMP Watcher Service. Morrison decided to take control of the situation and confront the problem head on. However, it is obvious that he rushed to judgment and...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
3,413
Shattered Illusions
Twenty-four years after he was fired by the RCMP in 1958 for misappropriating government funds, the last person in the world that James Morrison was thinking about was Yevgeni Brik. However, three significant back-to-back events changed the landscape for Morrison in ways he would never have imagined.
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
3,044
Shattered Illusions
The CSIS was born from the rib of the RCMP, Security Service. There had long been a heated debate as to whether a country’s security intelligence responsibility should be a part of, or divorced from, that same country’s national police force. Fierce lobbying within Canada called for the separation of the Security Service and the creation of an independent security intelligence...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
3,239
Shattered Illusions
Preparations to mount an exfiltration operation overseas had to begin immediately considering the day of extraction was set as June 19, just sixty-nine days away. A great deal of operational and administrative planning had to commence immediately. It would require the skill and time of several within CSIS and other Canadian government departments to ensure a successful outcome. Chief among the...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2,055
Shattered Illusions
Approximately ten days before the official launch of the exfiltration operation, Geoffrey O’Brian called Don Mahar down to his office in the Counter Intelligence Branch. Once again, John Cummings was sitting with him discussing the upcoming operation.
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2,439
Shattered Illusions
Yevgeni Brik’s operational debriefing began in earnest a week after he arrived in Ottawa. These daily sessions were always conducted by Don Mahar. As their meetings progressed, Robbie McLeod would occasionally take charge of Brik for a day and take him off to view another apartment or deal with some other facet of his personal requirements. Health coverage, medical and dental examinations,...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2,717
Shattered Illusions
As the weeks and the debriefing of Yevgeni Brik progressed at CSIS headquarters, it was evident that he was unhappy in regard to his personal life, and this manifested itself in the operational debriefings as well. Brik’s problems of a personal nature fell to Robbie McLeod to address. Brik was annoyed that he had not been awarded Canadian citizenship when he entered Canada or that he did not...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,593
Shattered Illusions
During a break in the debriefing protocol with CSIS officer Don Mahar, Yevgeni Brik spent additional time with CSIS officer Robbie McLeod. One of Brik’s sincerest wishes was to obtain an Ontario driver’s licence and to purchase a new vehicle, a GMC Tracker. McLeod had very good relations with key individuals within the provincial and federal government departments. He was...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
3,286
Shattered Illusions
It was a gorgeous summer day as the sun drenched the prisoners and workers at Camp #19, along with the inhabitants of the nearby village of Temnikovka. It was August 19, 1970, precisely fifteen years to the day that Yevgeni Brik had arrived back in Moscow from Ottawa in 1955. So much had happened to him after he descended the stairs from the aircraft and was driven to KGB headquarters at Lubyanka...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2,274
Shattered Illusions
During his years of imprisonment, Yevgeni Brik wanted to reach out to Canadian intelligence. But in spite of this, he instinctively knew that there was virtually no chance that he would ever see Canada again. Or, for that matter, any other country outside the Soviet Union.
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2,803
Shattered Illusions
Yevgeni Brik informed Don Mahar that he changed his strategy in January 1992. He decided his next trip would be to Vilnius, Lithuania. In preparation for his last trip to Riga, Latvia, Brik had created a cypher message that he intended to hand over to the British ambassador. However, he judged at the time that conditions were such that he would not risk giving it to him. He simply did not have...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
1,485
Shattered Illusions
Following the successful exfiltration of Yevgeni Vladimirovich Brik in June 1992, he lived in Ottawa, Ontario, for nineteen years. At one point he moved to a new apartment, one that CSIS officer Robbie McLeod tried very hard to dissuade him of but Brik insisted. In the greatest of ironies, it was just a short walk from the Russian Embassy on Charlotte Street.
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
2,030
Shattered Illusions
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
3,737
Shattered Illusions
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
449
Shattered Illusions
Operation KEYSTONE is a case that, until 1992, had been resting in the relative quiet of the CSIS and Library and Archives Canada’s archives. With only minimal interruption, these historic, top-secret files have been gathering dust since the early 1960s. Yevgeni Vladimirovich Brik returned to Moscow in 1955. The files remained active for a few short years following his departure but...
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
536
Shattered Illusions
Donald G. Mahar served forty-one years in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Security Service; the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS); and Communications Secu
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
121
Shattered Illusions
In this post–September 11, 2001, era, there has been rapid growth in the number of professional intelligence training and educational programs across the United States and abroad. Colleges and universities, as well as high schools, are developing programs and courses in homeland security, intelligence analysis, and law enforcement, in support of national security.
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
202
Shattered Illusions
Donald G. Mahar
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
574
Illustrations in this section
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