Description: Managing Time and Stress
Nearly every academic leadership workshop I’ve ever led on any topic eventually became a workshop on managing time and stress. We’d be talking about ways of improving communication within our units, building collegiality, developing creative plans for the future, or some other subject, and inevitably someone would say, “That’s all well and good, but I barely...
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
1,305
Description: Managing Time and Stress
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
20
Description: Managing Time and Stress
There’s an old story about someone who invited a few friends over for dinner and was joined by them in the kitchen as he was preparing the meal. He took a roast out of the refrigerator and, before placing it into the oven, sliced about three inches off of each end and threw these pieces away. “Why did you do that?” one of his friends asked him. “I’m not...
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
1,446
Description: Managing Time and Stress
Time is only one of the resources we are required to manage as academic leaders. We also have to manage such things as money, equipment, the faculty and staff we work with, the flow of information that we want to make available to others, the buildings we use for teaching and research, and plenty more as well (Hansen, 2011, 22–29). For the ease of illustration, let’s focus on...
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
2,095
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Description: Managing Time and Stress
Dwight D. Eisenhower, supreme commander of the Allied Expeditionary Forces in Europe and later president of the United States, was fond of saying, “What is important is seldom urgent, and what is urgent is seldom important.” At first, such a statement appears almost Zen-like in its obscurity. After all, aren’t the words urgent and important synonyms?...
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
1,578
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Description: Managing Time and Stress
Albert Einstein is famous for his concept of the space-time continuum: the notion that space and time are not really separate phenomena but can merge into one another. In time management, we want to consider a parallel phenomenon: the Time-Money Continuum, the notion that, as we saw with the Brewster’s Millions Experiment, there are ways in which time can be seen as money and money...
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
2,210
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Description: Managing Time and Stress
In the last chapter, we saw that time was only one part of a nexus of resources (including people, technology, information, communication, and space) that academic leaders have available to them. Now we want to add one additional component to that list of resources: energy.
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
2,536
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Description: Managing Time and Stress
Another way of gaining a better sense of how you’re currently using your time (and thus how you might make needed adjustments to those practices) is to keep a time log. In fact, I’ve rarely read a book on time management or attended a workshop on this subject that didn’t devote considerable attention to the matter of time logs.
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
2,329
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Description: Managing Time and Stress
To-do lists are similar to time logs in that, if done well, they can be terrific tools for effective time management but, if done poorly, they simply waste time that academic leaders don’t have to spare. A well-constructed to-do list can:
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
2,807
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Description: Managing Time and Stress
Paperwork can be the bane of the academic leader’s existence. Administrators are expected to generate a large number of reports, proposals, e-mails, forms, and memos, plus there’s another huge mound of documents in the sheer amount of material they’re expected to read, digest, and file. The documents involved in academic administration are both electronic and printed, and...
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
2,833
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Description: Managing Time and Stress
Sometimes we’re not as efficient as we’d like to be because we haven’t clarified in our minds exactly what we’d like to accomplish. We may know, for instance, that we’d like to reduce the degree of conflict between those two faculty members who are always arguing at meetings or that we’d like to align our program’s goals more closely with those of...
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
2,000
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Description: Managing Time and Stress
Simply because an activity is time-consuming doesn’t mean it isn’t worthwhile. In fact, many of the things that academic leaders do—drafting grant applications, preparing budget proposals, evaluating members of the faculty and staff, preparing long-term plans, and the like—require days, weeks, or even months.
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
1,715
Description: Managing Time and Stress
In the last chapter, we touched on the topic of doing things because they were habitual, not because they were rewarding or productive. In this chapter, we want to expand on this idea by considering how we can go about replacing bad habits with good habits and transforming unpleasant habits into more rewarding habits.
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
2,213
Description: Managing Time and Stress
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
20
Description: Managing Time and Stress
From everything we hear on the news, we’re likely to conclude that stress is a horrible thing that produces absolutely no benefits and that we ought to eliminate stress from our lives as much as possible. But that really isn’t the case. There’s both good stress and bad stress. To understand why that’s the case, we first need to review what stress really is.
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
3,417
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Description: Managing Time and Stress
The first approach to dealing with stress that we’ll consider is one that most people are likely to regard as very innovative, perhaps even a bit strange, but it actually has a rather distinguished history. Although the Oxford English Dictionary cites examples of the word stress applied to people and their circumstances as early as the beginning of the fourteenth...
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
4,443
Description: Managing Time and Stress
The second major strategy that we’ll consider, reducing stress, consists of identifying as many situations as possible that trigger your stress and then avoiding the triggers when possible or dealing with them more skillfully when you can’t simply avoid them. On the Personal Stress Inventory that you completed at the end of chapter 12, you drew up a...
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
3,939
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Description: Managing Time and Stress
Of all the approaches to dealing with stress that we’ll consider, stress management is by far the most common. In fact, it’s such a common approach that many workshops and books (including this one) use stress management as a shorthand way to refer to everything that has to do with handling stress.
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
7,129
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Description: Managing Time and Stress
There are times when, no matter what we do, we can’t find a productive way to deal with the stress of being an academic leader. Despite our best efforts, it can almost seem as though circumstances (and perhaps even people) conspire against us to increase our tension and cause us anxiety. Most of the time, we just try to grit our teeth and bear it. But there are, in fact, more...
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
4,153
Description: Managing Time and Stress
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
22
Description: Managing Time and Stress
The final step in putting together a strategy for managing time and stress is making sure that all the pieces fit together for you. Rarely do people find that only one of the techniques we’ve explored in this book addresses their stress adequately and completely in every situation. A more holistic approach to stress requires us to prepare a toolkit of approaches that are likely to be...
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
2,837
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Description: Managing Time and Stress
Almost every leadership development program, whether designed for academic administrators or otherwise, at some point discusses the differences between leadership and management. People quote some of Warren Bennis’s famous observations, such as “The manager maintains; the leader develops,” “The manager asks how and when; the leader asks what and why,” or (most...
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
567
Description: Managing Time and Stress
Resources on Time and Stress Management for Academic Leaders
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
1,951
Description: Managing Time and Stress
ATLAS: Academic Training, Leadership, & Assessment Services offers training programs, books, and materials dealing with collegiality and positive academic leadership. Its more than fifty highly interactive programs include the following:
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
482
Description: Managing Time and Stress
the Bactrian camel (metaphor), 27, 27, 38
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
3,573
Description: Managing Time and Stress
Jeffrey L. Buller, current director of leadership and professional development at Florida Atlantic University, has served in administrative positions ranging from department chair to vice president for academic affairs at four very different institutions: Loras College, Georgia Southern University, Mary Baldwin College, and Florida Atlantic University. He is the author of more than a dozen...
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
258
Description: Managing Time and Stress
To Walt Gmelch, Peter Seldin, Tim Hatfield, and Christian Hansen, my personal gurus in managing time and stress.
Jeffrey L. Buller
Rowman & Littlefield
277
Illustrations in this section