Building New China, Colonizing Kokonor
In August 1959, a twenty-three-year-old math teacher named Shu Jialing arrived in Qinghai Province to take up her first job.1 A native of Nanchong city in the northern part of Sichuan Province, she had just graduated from the Sichuan Institute of Education in Chengdu and was a member of the Youth League, the junior branch of the Communist Party of China....
Gregory Rohlf
Lexington Books
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Building New China, Colonizing Kokonor
In this chapter, we examine the Party-state’s rationales for resettlement. We therefore examine push factors for migration: ideas, policies, leaders, institutional apparata, and more generally, the use of force by the state and government to compel one to leave one’s home. In the context of 1950s China, the most important push factors included direct political pressure in the workplace...
Gregory Rohlf
Lexington Books
16,721
Building New China, Colonizing Kokonor
Beginning in fall 1955, zhibian Youth League resettlement was promoted heavily in the national media and with a significantly different conceptualization. Front page news stories featured photos of heroic youth volunteers and made their leaders celebrities.1 No social welfare resettlers described in chapter 1—dam evictees,...
Gregory Rohlf
Lexington Books
14,389
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Building New China, Colonizing Kokonor
First Wave resettlement was launched by the Hu Yaobang’s Communist Youth League in the fall of 1955 as a purposeful emulation of the Soviet Union’s Virgin Lands program. The rhetoric of heroic, selfless sacrifice, of contributing one’s youth, of disregarding the pain and hardships of frontier life were central elements in the propaganda for both Communist programs, constructing...
Gregory Rohlf
Lexington Books
7,354
Building New China, Colonizing Kokonor
Gregory Rohlf
Lexington Books
19,850
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Building New China, Colonizing Kokonor
In many places, resettlers were never integrated into the life of the villages and co-ops. In the view of Qinghai locals, perceived and real problems in resettlers’ attitudes, behavior, and customs became the cause and locus of social problems. But it was also true that locals discriminated against the newcomers in many ways. Resettlers were paid less for the same work, or...
Gregory Rohlf
Lexington Books
15,628
Building New China, Colonizing Kokonor
We begin this chapter on the transition to second wave resettlement—heavy Youth League resettlement to Amdo starting in 1958—with a summary of the Ministry of the Interior’s August 1957 report on resettlement. The events and policies that created the second wave have multiple institutional origins and were pushed forward by multiple actors. The Ministry of the Interior lost...
Gregory Rohlf
Lexington Books
9,725
Building New China, Colonizing Kokonor
Gregory Rohlf
Lexington Books
12,642
Illustrations in this section
Building New China, Colonizing Kokonor
Even in areas that were not on the front lines of the rebellion in the Chaidam Basin, the second wave of resettlement was a wretched and destructive ordeal for the land, for locals, and for the resettlers themselves. A small number of internal documents show that the long-awaited tempering experience described in the propaganda turned out to be fraught with disappointment, alienation,...
Gregory Rohlf
Lexington Books
15,694
Illustrations in this section
  • Building New China, Colonizing Kokonor
    Gregory Rohlf
    Lexington Books
    3,252
    Illustrations in this section
  • Building New China, Colonizing Kokonor
    ~Gregory Rohlf is associate professor of history at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California. He is a specialist in modern Chinese history and has published on western China and Tibet, gender in state expansion, frontiers and urbanization. He has also published in the pedagogy of field trips in history education. Rohlf completed...
    Gregory Rohlf
    Lexington Books
    132