Description: Television and Political Communication in the Late Soviet Union
ch.
Kirsten Bönker
Lexington Books
202
Description: Television and Political Communication in the Late Soviet Union
It is not easy to name all the colleagues and friends who supported and enhanced my research and encouraged me in the writing of this book. All their suggestions, corrections, and comments greatly helped to make a book out of my first vague idea to explore the way Soviet people watched television and made use of the medium. I am particularly obliged to Stephan Merl (Bielefeld University),...
Kirsten Bönker
Lexington Books
1,094
Description: Television and Political Communication in the Late Soviet Union
“Soviet television, well, I cannot say that it was a propaganda sphere for me because I just did not...
Kirsten Bönker
Lexington Books
14,570
Description: Television and Political Communication in the Late Soviet Union
As early as in the late 1950s, the TV set became a symbol of the new Soviet lifestyle. The Soviet TV set reflected the fact that the Cold War competition pushed the regime to pay greater attention to material culture and the standard of living on the domestic front. During the so-called kitchen debate on the opening of the American trade exhibition in Moscow in July 1959, Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev and U.S. vice president Richard Nixon propagated the peaceful competition between the two power blocs. Focusing on consumer goods and lifestyle, both Khrushchev and Nixon deemed television to be a vital element to gain the future victory in the Cold War. Both verbally competed over which political system would offer the more attractive lifestyle based on labor-saving and recreational devices for ordinary...
Kirsten Bönker
Lexington Books
15,029
Illustrations in this section
  • Description: Television and Political Communication in the Late Soviet Union
    In 1956, the director of Tomsk television reported that the amount of “immoral acts and bringings to court” in a city district of Tomsk had recently dropped due to the rising number of TV sets. “As early as 7 p.m., the...
    Kirsten Bönker
    Lexington Books
    23,287
    Illustrations in this section
  • Description: Television and Political Communication in the Late Soviet Union
    “Regarding television as the most far-reaching mass media, I regret the loss of certain substance (. . .), if you wish a fine aesthetic content.”1~1. The interview with Yuri was conducted by Elena Bogdanova in St. Petersburg in...
    Kirsten Bönker
    Lexington Books
    16,395
    Description: Television and Political Communication in the Late Soviet Union
    “Dear television workers, how...
    Kirsten Bönker
    Lexington Books
    13,991
    Illustrations in this section
  • Description: Television and Political Communication in the Late Soviet Union
    “Obrashchaius’ k vam za pomoshch’iu” (I...
    Kirsten Bönker
    Lexington Books
    14,645
    Description: Television and Political Communication in the Late Soviet Union
    Renowned sociologist Boris M. Firsov retrospectively analyzed how the Khrushchev regime handled television in its early days and what a reasonable policy might have been in order to stabilize Soviet rule—namely to hold a dialog with the audience. Firsov obviously supposed Soviet television to have missed a great opportunity. One could agree with him in many respects but perhaps not in all....
    Kirsten Bönker
    Lexington Books
    5,797
    Description: Television and Political Communication in the Late Soviet Union
    Kirsten Bönker
    Lexington Books
    10,217
    Description: Television and Political Communication in the Late Soviet Union
    Kirsten Bönker is research fellow of the Gerda Henkel-Foundation. She was visiting professor of East European History at the Georg-August-University of Göttingen in 2019/20. From 2014 to 2018, she was visiting professor of East European History, the History of Modern Societies, and Contemporary History at Bielefeld University and at the Carl von Ossietzky...
    Kirsten Bönker
    Lexington Books
    100

    List of illustrations