Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
Over three decades ago, one of the authors, a newly minted college student, sat in the audience of a live academic debate, utterly baffled. He’d tried following arguments. In fact, part of his grade in an argumentation course depended on it. But as anyone who’s attended a college forensics tournament knows, policy debaters are known for rattling off reasons at breakneck tempos. To the...
John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
385
Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
We are extremely grateful to the folks at Lexington Books for their assistance with this project. In particular, we appreciate Bob Denton for sharing our vision for the book. We also thank our editor, Nicolette Amstutz, for her always efficient, competent, helpful, and gracious responses to our frequent and pesky questions. We also appreciate Sierra Apaliski and Jessica Tepper for helping us with...
John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
416
Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
In a political world where appealing images often overshadow the substance of messages, it is ironic, perhaps, that the face of one of our least attractive, yet most sagacious, politicians is so ubiquitous, gazing back from the likes of statues and stamps, memorials and monuments, portraits and pennies. Indeed, by most accounts, the 16th president of the United States had an unpleasant...
John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
8,698
Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
The visual aspect of televised political debates has provided candidates an opportunity to reach voters and manage their impressions beyond their policy arguments. Ever since the 1960 Kennedy-Nixon debate, scholars, media analysists, and political pundits have talked about the importance of the visual image a candidate presents on stage. In this chapter, we take a closer look at the fundamental...
John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
7,018
Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
As the contest for United States president heated up in early days of September 2012, the incumbent, Barack Obama, had reason for optimism. His party’s nominating convention not only provided a significant “bounce” in his polling numbers, by most indications, his projected lead in Electoral College votes was substantial (Obama ahead, 2012). By September’s end, however, the...
John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
9,177
Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
Although civility suggests that candidates in political debates should remain silent while their opponents are speaking, it is not always easy fading into the background, especially when you are under attack. Take the legendary Lincoln-Douglas debates of 1858, for instance. In the fourth debate, Abraham Lincoln announced that until Stephen Douglas “gives a better or more...
John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
8,245
Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
During the first presidential debate of 1960, while Senator John F. Kennedy and Vice President Richard Nixon sparred before a television audience of 70 million Americans, a contest of a different kind was taking place in the WBBM-TV control room (Schroeder, 2000). There, Don Hewitt, the debate’s director, had his hands full. According to Alan Schroeder (2000, p. 6), with the debate in...
John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
9,482
Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
“The heart of politics,” wrote W. Lawrence Neuman, “is persuasion” (1998, p. 319), an observation reflected in the first handbooks of social influence, or rhetoric. Penned in ancient Greece by teachers known as sophists, these handbooks instructed students in the art of persuading fellow citizens in the context of political gatherings. During that same era, Aristotle...
John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
7,548
Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
The practice of rhetoric (essentially, persuasion) is almost certainly as old as the earliest human settlements, and so vitally important to participating in the civic lives of ancient Athenians and Romans that citizens often pursued formal training. The first people we know of to write a systematic treatment of rhetoric were the Sicilians Corax (the teacher) and Tisias (a student of Corax)...
John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
12,105
Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
When Hillary Rodham Clinton and Donald J. Trump took the stage for the first of three televised presidential debates in late September of 2016, the country had already witnessed several notable “firsts” in U.S. history. First, the Republican primary elections included a record 17 major candidates, more than in any previous primary election (Linshi, 2015). In another first, Hillary...
John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
11,341
Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
Note: The first candidate listed won the election that year.
John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
540
Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
18,073
Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
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John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
5,297
Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
John S. Seiter (PhD, University of Southern California) is a Distinguished Professor of Communication Studies in the Department of Languages, Philosophy, and Communication Studies at Utah State University. His research focuses broadly on persuasion and specifically on topics such as political aggression, effective approaches to compliance gaining, deception...
John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
248
Description: Nonverbal Communication in Political Debates
This series encourages focused work examining the role and function of communication in the realm of politics including campaigns and elections, media, and political institutions.
John S. Seiter and Harry Weger Jr.
Lexington Books
250